Sunday, August 17, 2025

Cookies



Blogger said I need to post a notice about cookies if theirs doesn't show up, to satisfy European laws. I don't see theirs on my page, maybe because of something to do with my page setup.
So here it is.
Blogger keeps cookies.
I might have apps that keep cookies, I don't know.
I do not personally keep cookies.


Monday, November 04, 2024

The structure of this blog



I have several blog posts that are at the top of my blog for extended periods of time, because I believe they are of continuing usefulness. So when you look at my blog, the fact that the first few are the same doesn't mean I haven't updated the blog recently.

Friday, May 01, 2020

Reliable and unreliable media


Links to my posts with links to reliability of various "news" web sites

Media bias chart
http://patriciashannon.blogspot.com/2018/01/media-bias-chart.html

10 Journalism Brands Where You Find Real Facts Rather Than Alternative Facts according to Forbes
http://patriciashannon.blogspot.com/2017/03/10-journalism-brands-where-you-find.html

Snopes' Field Guide to Fake News Sites and Hoax Purveyors
http://patriciashannon.blogspot.com/2016/07/snopes-field-guide-to-fake-news-sites.html

Honest Reporting
http://patriciashannon.blogspot.com/2017/03/honest-reporting.html

If You’re A Liberal, Stop Sharing Links From These Fake News Sites
http://patriciashannon.blogspot.com/2017/03/if-youre-liberal-stop-sharing-links.html

============================================

Fact-checking sites:

https://www.snopes.com/

http://www.politifact.com/

http://factcheck.org/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/fact-checker/

https://www.americanpressinstitute.org/category/fact-checking-project/

Thursday, July 18, 2019

Pot linked to more use of all kinds of discipline

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-07/osu-mum071619.php

News Release 17-Jul-2019
Marijuana use may not make parents more 'chill'
Pot linked to more use of all kinds of discipline
Ohio State University

•••••

A study of California parents found that current marijuana users administered more discipline techniques of all kinds to their children on average than did non-users. That includes everything from timeouts to, in some cases, physical abuse.

•••••

The effect of marijuana use on parenting is a relevant concern: A 2017 survey from Yahoo News and Marist College found that 54 percent of adults who use marijuana in the United States are parents. A majority of those parents have children under the age of 18. Some groups of "marijuana moms" claim that use makes them better parents.

The results of this new study suggest that marijuana users - who are nearly always (92 percent of the time) also alcohol users - are trying to control their kids more than non-users, Freisthler said.

"It appears that users may be quicker than other parents to react to minor misbehavior," she said.

"We can't tell from this study, but it may be that parents who use marijuana or alcohol don't want their children to spoil the buzz they have, or bother them when they have a hangover."

•••••

Parents who had used alcohol or marijuana in the past, but were not at the time of the research interview, also applied most types of discipline more often than did non-users.

And the more substances that parents used, the more often they disciplined their children in all types of ways, according to the study. For example, parents who reported using the most substances practiced physical abuse at a rate about 1.45 times greater than those who used only one substance.

Results showed that the annual frequency of physical abuse was 0.5 times higher among parents who used both alcohol and marijuana in the past year, compared to those who consumed only alcohol.

•••••

tags: drug abuse, child abuse

Pseudo-Patriots



Pseudo-Patriots
copyright Patricia M. Shannon 1996

They say that they are patriots because they love to wave the flag,
but they throw their trash along the road, and pour used oil down the drain.
They say that they are patriots because the pledge they love to say,
but they never bother to turn out the lights when they go home for the day.

How can we be patriots and not do all we can
to protect the earth upon which all our lives depend?
How can we be patriots and not help our fellow men?
What else is a country, but its people and its land?

They say that they are patriots because, they will always choose
to vote to build more prisons, while cutting funding for our schools.
They say that they are patriots, Star Spangled Banner they do sing,
but to their big gas-guzzlers they selfishly do cling.

How can we be patriots and not do all we can
to prevent the earth from turning into barren sands?
How can we be patriots and not lend a helping hand?
What else is a country, but its people and its land?

They say that they are patriots, because it fills them with such glee
to send our young folks overseas to be killed by enemies.
They say that they are patriots, but they would never think
to tutor some poor kids to help them stay out of the clink.

How can we be patriots and not do all we can
to protect the earth upon which all our lives depend?
How can we be patriots and not help our fellow men?
What else is a country, but its people and its land?

A country's not a piece of cloth, or words we say by rote;
a country's not a song we sing before we watch a sport.
And love's not just a feeling, it's something that we do,
every day, in every way, in everything we choose.




Exercise offers protection against Alzheimer's

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-07/mgh-eop071219.php

News Release 16-Jul-2019
Massachusetts General Hospital

Higher levels of daily physical activity may protect against the cognitive decline and neurodegeneration (brain tissue loss) from Alzheimer's disease (AD) that alters the lives of many older people, researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have found. In a paper in JAMA Neurology, the team also reported that lowering vascular risk factors may offer additional protection against Alzheimer's and delay progression of the devastating disease.

•••••

Earth Experiences Hottest June Ever on Record in 2019

https://weather.com/en-IN/india/news/news/2019-07-16-earth-experiences-hottest-june-ever-record-2019

By TWC India Edit Team
July 16, 2019

•••••

As per the data released by the American space agency NASA on Monday, the global average land-ocean temperatures were 0.93°C above the normal temperature (taking 1951 to 1980 as base years). Such high temperatures have never been observed on Earth in recorded history since 1880. June of 2016 was the second-highest at 0.82°C above normal temperatures. A strong El Niño in 2015-16 was behind the high temperatures that year.

Despite being a weak El Niño year, the margin with which this year’s June temperatures have breached the 2016 levels is a cause of concern for the climate community. As the push to declare climate emergency is gaining pace across the globe, the record temperatures of June is likely to feed the movement.
Of course, there have been many El Niños in the past, weak and strong, so if that were the only factor, we wouldn't keep having record highs.

•••••

One of many impacts of warmer average temperatures, as illustrated by the IPCC reports, is the higher occurrence of extreme weather events such as tropical cyclones, heatwaves, floods and droughts. In 2018, there were 70 tropical cyclones all over the world, while the long term average is just 53. The extreme rainfall episodes after a long dry spell have become a common occurrence in India this June and July leading to flash floods and extensive losses of life and property.

•••••

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Most Miserable Weather Record Ever? Miami Just Tied Its Warmest Night of All-Time

https://www.wunderground.com/news/news/weather/news/2019-07-16-miami-tied-all-time-record-warm-low-temperature

Brian Donegan
Published: July 16, 2019

Miami has tied what is arguably the most miserable weather record that a city could set – the low temperature in the South Florida city didn't dip below the mid-80s Sunday morning.

Officially, at Miami International Airport, Sunday's low has gone down in the record books as 84 degrees, tying the city's all-time warmest low temperature for any month of the year, according to the National Weather Service.

An 84-degree low was also recorded in September 1897, August 1993, August 2017 (twice) and September 2017, so Sunday was the sixth occurrence of this all-time record-warm low in Miami and the first time the low was that warm in July. The previous record-warm low for July was 83 degrees on multiple occasions.

•••••

tags: extreme weather

Slow-Moving Hurricanes Like Barry Growing More Common



Dr. Jeff Masters · July 15, 2019, 12:32 PM EDT

As Tropical Storm Barry intensified into a hurricane on its three-day trek along the Gulf Coast, the storm moved at an excruciatingly slow pace—between three and nine miles per hour. The very slow motion allowed Barry to generate a larger storm surge and dump heavier rains than a faster-moving storm would have (though most of those rains happened to fall offshore this time because of Barry's unusual structure). A study published on June 3, 2019 by scientists from NASA and NOAA found that North Atlantic hurricanes like Barry have been stalling near the coast with increasing frequency in recent decades, resulting in an increase in dangerous heavy rainfall.

•••••

Barry’s 14.58” of Rain in Arkansas Breaks All-Time State Record

https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/Barrys-1458-Rain-Arkansas-Breaks-All-Time-State-Record?cm_ven=cat6-widget

Dr. Jeff Masters · July 17, 2019, 11:28 AM EDT

Update: Dierks, Arkansas reported a 24-hour rainfall amount of 16.17" July 15 - 16, 2019, from Tropical Depression Barry, with an additional 0.42" falling during the previous three days, potentially from Barry. The storm total of 16.17 - 16.59" thus establishes a new all-time state record for rain from a tropical cyclone.

Rainfall from Tropical Depression Barry deluged southwest Arkansas over the past three days, with the 14.58” that fell at Murfreesboro on July 14 - 16 breaking the all-time state record for precipitation from a tropical cyclone. Barry’s heavy rains that fell over southwest Arkansas inundated multiple highways, including I-30, and prompted four high-water rescues, according to weather.com. The heaviest rains from Barry have been in Louisiana, though, with 23.58” at Beauregard.

•••••

tags: extreme weather, severe weather

Woman nearly loses sight in one eye after wearing contacts in shower and pool

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/woman-nearly-loses-sight-one-eye-after-wearing-contacts-shower-n1030876

July 17, 2019, 5:00 PM EDT
By Shamard Charles, M.D.

You may want to think twice about showering or swimming with your contact lenses in.

A 41-year-old woman in England nearly lost her vision in one eye from an infection she got after swimming and showering while wearing contact lenses. Her case is described in a brief report published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

•••••

Ebola outbreak in Congo declared a global health emergency

https://news.yahoo.com/ebola-outbreak-congo-declared-global-175202499.html

MARIA CHENG and JAMEY KEATEN
,Associated Press•July 17, 2019

The deadly Ebola outbreak in Congo is now an international health emergency, the World Health Organization announced Wednesday after a case was confirmed in a city of 2 million people .

A WHO expert committee declined on three previous occasions to advise the United Nations health agency to make the declaration for this outbreak, even though other experts say it has long met the required conditions. More than 1,600 people have died since August in the second-deadliest Ebola outbreak in history, which is unfolding in a region described as a war zone.

A declaration of a global health emergency often brings greater international attention and aid, along with concerns that nervous governments might overreact with border closures.

•••••

Those working in the field say the outbreak is clearly taking a turn for the worse despite advances that include the widespread use of an experimental but effective Ebola vaccine.

•••••


Creditors Start Asking Coastal Cities For Their Climate Plans

https://news.bloombergenvironment.com/environment-and-energy/creditors-start-asking-coastal-cities-for-their-climate-plans

July 17, 2019, 4:46 PM

Financial credit rating institutions want answers from coastal cities about how they’re preparing for climate-change impacts like sea level rise and whether they can pay for their adaptation plans, the mayor of Honolulu said July 17.

Mayor Kirk Caldwell (D), who has been leading Hawaii’s capital city since 2013, said he was asked for the first time by credit raters like Moody’s Corp. and Fitch Ratings Inc. during recent presentations in San Francisco on municipal bonds about how the city is addressing climate change impacts.

•••••

For example, Moody’s Analytics in a June report found climate change impacts such as rising temperatures, intensifying extreme weather events, and sea level rise would disrupt communities, threaten infrastructure, and hurt economic productivity.

•••••

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Slow-Moving Hurricanes Like Barry Growing More Common

https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/Slow-Moving-Hurricanes-Barry-Growing-More-Common

Dr. Jeff Masters · July 15, 2019, 12:32 PM EDT

As Tropical Storm Barry intensified into a hurricane on its three-day trek along the Gulf Coast, the storm moved at an excruciatingly slow pace—between three and nine miles per hour. The very slow motion allowed Barry to generate a larger storm surge and dump heavier rains than a faster-moving storm would have (though most of those rains happened to fall offshore this time because of Barry's unusual structure). A study published on June 3, 2019 by scientists from NASA and NOAA found that North Atlantic hurricanes like Barry have been stalling near the coast with increasing frequency in recent decades, resulting in an increase in dangerous heavy rainfall.

The scientists said that there was not a clear mechanism explaining the observed tropical cyclone speed reduction, and that natural variability and/or human-caused climate change could be to blame. “There is some evidence that those large-scale wind patterns are slowing down in the tropics, where Atlantic storms usually start,” said Hall. “The storms are not being pushed as hard by the current that moves them along. That’s a climate change signal.”

•••••

The results of the new study agree with those of a June 2018 study by University of Wisconsin hurricane scientist Jim Kossin, A global slowdown of tropical-cyclone translation speed, which found that the forward speed of tropical cyclones has decreased globally by about 10% since 1949. As a result of their slower forward motion, these storms are now more likely to drop heavier rains, increasing their flood risk. Most significantly, the study reported a 20% slow-down in storm translation speed over land for Atlantic storms, a 30% slow-down over land for Northwest Pacific storms, and a 19% slow-down over land for storms affecting the Australia region. A storm moving 20% slower over land has the opportunity to dump up to 20% more rain atop a given point over land, increasing the flood risk for flood defense systems designed for a 20th-century climate with less extreme precipitation events. The paper concluded that “these trends have almost certainly increased local rainfall totals in these regions.” Another increased hazard slower storms bring is increased wind damage, due to an increase in the duration of damaging winds structures are exposed to.

•••••

tags: extreme weather, severe weather

Saturday, July 13, 2019

Chernobyl's power plant managers 'hid' their radiation levels so they could protect cleanup workers


Contrast this to the CEOs who, for the sake of enriching themselves, knowingly sell products that harm and even kill their customers, and who who provide their workers to work in unsafe conditions.

https://news.yahoo.com/chernobyls-power-plant-managers-hid-130000474.html

Chernobyl's power plant managers 'hid' their radiation levels so they could protect cleanup workers, according to former deputy director
Aria Bendix
,Business Insider•July 12, 2019

Chernobyl was one of the worst nuclear disasters the world has ever seen, resulting in widespread contamination throughout Europe.

Workers on the cleanup site immediately following the accident had to record their radiation levels using a dosimeter, or device that measures a person's dose of radiation.

The former deputy director of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, Alexander Kovalenko, said management officials used to hide their dosimeters in less contaminated areas so they would be permitted to stay on the job site.

•••••

The job was so high-stakes, Kovalenko said, that management officials found ways to under-report their levels of radiation in order remain on the job site.

"I was amazed at people's behavior," he said. "No one was waiting for [an] order. ... People worked not from fear, but from conscience. No one thought about punishment or rewards and money."

•••••

His personal mission became twofold: to prevent staffers from becoming "burned," or irradiated, and to stick around long enough to finish the cleanup. Because of that, he said, managers at the plant were willing to incur higher levels of radiation to protect their staff.

"We did not want to quit what we started," he said. "I, like almost everyone in management, hid the dosimeter in the 'clean zone,' [an area outside the power plant determined to have safe levels of radiation]." This ensured that Kovalenko's dosimeter showed lower doses of radiation than he was actually receiving.

The trick allowed him to continue working in the contaminated area for about five months, until he was eventually caught by monitors who traced his route.

•••••

Alaska Chokes on Wildfires as Heat Waves Dry Out the Arctic

https://insideclimatenews.org/news/11072019/arctic-wildfires-alaska-climate-change-heat-wave-2019-university-funding

By Bob Berwyn, InsideClimate News
Jul 11, 2019

•••••

Global warming has been thawing tundra and drying vast stretches of the far-northern boreal forests, and it also has spurred more thunderstorms with lightning, which triggered many of the fires burning in Alaska this year, said Brian Brettschneider, a climate scientist with the International Arctic Research Center who closely tracks Alaskan and Arctic extreme weather.

So far this year, wildfires have scorched more than 1.2 million acres in Alaska, making it one of the state's three biggest fire years on record to this date, with high fire danger expected to persist in the weeks ahead.

Several studies, as well as ongoing satellite monitoring, show that fires are spreading farther north into the Arctic, burning more intensely and starting earlier in the year, in line with what climate models have long suggested would happen as sea ice dwindles and ocean and air temperatures rise.

•••••

Across the state:

For the first time in the 95-year record, the year-long July-to-June average temperature for Alaska as a whole was above freezing, showing the persistence of much warmer than average temperatures over the state.

For the year to date, the Alaska statewide average temperature was 7.9°F above average, according to NOAA's latest National State of the Climate report.

During the last 67 years, Anchorage saw a total of 17 days with a temperature of 81°F or above. This year, 81 was the average temperature for a 12-day stretch in late June and early July, Brettschneider posted on Twitter.

On July 4, Anchorage hit 90°F, breaking the city's all-time record by 5 degrees.

•••••

‘A floodier future’: Scientists say records will be broken

https://www.apnews.com/86d5cb43a2f84f569b4990f1a233b98f

By WAYNE PARRYJuly 10, 2019

The federal government is warning Americans to brace for a “floodier” future.

Government scientists predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year because of rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system.

A report released Wednesday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts that sunny day flooding, also known as tidal flooding, will continue to increase.

•••••

The report predicted that annual flood records will be broken again next year and for years and decades to come from sea-level rise.

“Flooding that decades ago usually happened only during a powerful or localized storm can now happen when a steady breeze or a change in coastal current overlaps with a high tide,” it read.

The nationwide average frequency of sunny day flooding in 2018 was five days a year, tying a record set in 2015.

But the East Coast averaged twice as much flooding.

The agency says the level of sunny day flooding in the U.S. has doubled since 2000.

•••••

Residents slapped with eviction notices after AP story

https://news.yahoo.com/residents-slapped-eviction-notices-ap-203723006.html

AMANDA MORRIS
,Associated Press•July 11, 2019

Two mobile home residents in North Carolina were hit with eviction notices Thursday, shortly after complaining to The Associated Press about spikes in their monthly lot rental.

The notices from Florida-based company Time Out Communities were delivered two days after the residents were prominently featured in an AP story on those living in hurricane-ravaged Robeson County.

•••••

Both residents told the AP that their rent had doubled or tripled since Time Out bought the mobile home parks they live in. The rent hikes came while the county was still struggling to bounce back from hurricanes Matthew in 2016 and Florence in 2018. Residents and community activists say both hurricanes put a strain on affordable housing resources in the county.

•••••

Lesane previously told the AP he needed to save up several thousand dollars to pay for his mobile home to be moved from the land he is renting. So far, he said he saved about $800.

•••••

Company issues recall of hot dog and hamburger buns sold by Walmart, Sam's Club

https://news.yahoo.com/company-issues-recall-hot-dog-145614897.html

,AOL.com•July 11, 2019

Flowers Foods, the Georgia-based producer of packaged bakery food, has issued a voluntary recall of its hot dog and hamburger buns.

The company announced on Tuesday that it would pull more than 50 products with best-by dates of July 18 and July 19 after it discovered small pieces of hard plastic during production. Several of the recalled products are under the business's Wonder, 7-Eleven, Clover Valley, Nature's Own and Sunbeam brands.

•••••

Trump official resigns after climate change warning is blocked

https://news.yahoo.com/trump-official-resigns-climate-change-102424002.html

Juliet Eilperin
,The Independent•July 11, 2019

A State Department intelligence official who was blocked by the White House from submitting written congressional testimony on climate change last month is resigning from his post.

Rod Schoonover - who worked in the Office of the Geographer and Global Issues' Bureau of Intelligence and Research - spoke about the security risks the US faces due to climate change before the House Intelligence Committee on 5 June.

But White House officials would not let him submit the bureau's written statement that climate impacts could be "possibly catastrophic" after the State Department refused to cut references to federal scientific findings on climate change.

•••••

One of the statements White House officials objected to was the observation, "Absent extensive mitigating factors or events, we see few plausible future scenarios where significant - possibly catastrophic - harm does not arise from the compounded effects of climate change."

•••••

The US suicide rate is up 33% since 1999

https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/20/health/suicide-rates-nchs-study/index.html

By Jacqueline Howard, CNN
Updated 7:34 AM ET, Fri June 21, 2019

The suicide rate in the United States continues to climb, with a rate in 2017 that was 33% higher than in 1999, new research finds.
Suicide rates among people 15 to 64 increased significantly during that period, rising from 10.5 per 100,000 people in 1999 to 14 per 100,000 in 2017, the most recent year with available data, according to annual research published by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics on Thursday.

The report noted that America's suicide rates are at the highest level since World War II.

•••••